Archaeological find uncovers royal palace where Henry VIII and Elizabeth I were born

The team working on the major development of the Painted Hall in Greenwich have uncovered the remains of Greenwich Palace, notable as the birthplace of Henry VIII and of his daughters Mary and Elizabeth I. Greenwich Palace had a scale and magnificence comparable to Hampton Court Palace, in an idyllic riverside setting. It comprised everything from state apartments, courtyards, a chapel, elegant gardens, a substantial tiltyard for jousting with a five-storey tower for viewing, and was at the very heart of Tudor cultural life and intrigue. Careful preparation of the ground for the new visitor centre below the Painted Hall led to the discovery of two rooms of the Tudor palace, including a floor featuring lead-glazed tiles. Being set back from the river, these are likely to be from the service range, possibly where the kitchens, bakehouse, brewhouse and laundry were. One of the rooms was clearly subterranean and contains a series of unusual niches, which archaeologists believe may be &#14

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Ancient species of giant sloth that lived 10,000 years ago discovered in Mexico

Mexican scientists said Wednesday they have discovered the fossilized remains of a previously unknown species of giant sloth that lived 10,000 years ago and died at the bottom of a sinkhole. The Pleistocene-era remains were found in 2010, but were so deep inside the water-filled sinkhole that researchers were only gradually able to piece together what they were, the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) said in announcing the find. Scientists have so far hauled up the skull, jawbone, and a mixed bag of vertebrae, ribs claws and other bones, but the rest of the skeleton remains some 50 meters (165 feet) under water, the INAH said. Researchers are planning to bring up the rest by next year to continue studying the find — including to estimate how big the animal was.

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Reynolda House Museum of American Art presents 'Georgia O'Keeffe: Living Modern'

Reynolda House Museum of American Art will present Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern, a landmark exhibition organized by the Brooklyn Museum that examines the artist’s self-crafted persona through her art, her dress, and her progressive, independent lifestyle. More than 190 paintings, photographs, sculptures and personal objects will be on view August 18 – November 19, including jewelry, accessories, and garments from her wardrobe, some designed and made by the artist herself. The exhibition reveals the artist’s powerful ownership of her public and artistic identity and affirms that she embodied the same modern aesthetic in her self-fashioning as in her art. Reynolda House Museum of American Art is the only venue in the Southern U.S. for Georgia O’Keeffe: Living Modern. The exhibition features numerous portraits of the artist—many of them now iconic—taken by eminent photographers, including Alfred

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Exhibition highlights a major body of paintings by Monet produced in Giverny

The Vancouver Art Gallery is presenting the most comprehensive exhibition of French painter Claude Monet’s work in Canada in two decades. Claude Monet’s Secret Garden presents thirty-eight paintings spanning the career of one of the most important figures in Western art. Claude Monet’s Secret Garden culminates in a phenomenal body of work produced in Giverny, a small village in northern France where Monet resided from 1883 to the end of his life in 1926. A creative endeavour in their own right, the gardens that Monet designed and cultivated in Giverny became the central inspiration of his art. Its waterlilies—populated with exotic strains from as far as South America and the Middle East—weeping willows and the famed Japanese bridge endure as some of the most iconic imagery in art. These audaciously expressive works represent the summation of Monet’s lifelong dialogue with nature that guided him

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